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WRENN ‘Psychosexual’

Acting as the first release in two years though, WRENN's "Psychosexual" recognizes a modern hypocrisy and delivers through a crunchy gospel.

Deep in our hearts we all know that grunge truly never left but took on different forms throughout the years. And through the irony of the subculture’s “anti-fashion” becoming “in” once more, the mindset is an aspect that continues to come alive in various versions of alternative rock. Something that has been prevalent for Los Angeles’ WRENN since the isolated slow burner “I’m tired of being alone,” and  “Cease Fire” which go back about four years.

Acting as the first release in two years though, WRENN’s “Psychosexual” recognizes a modern hypocrisy and delivers through a crunchy gospel. Revolving around “the intersection of the physical, emotional, and digital world,” as explained by WRENN, the track follows a conversation how technology has impacted our lives. An aspect that isn’t apparent on the first listen but emerges through social jabs, pleasing “hologram Jesus,” and a dragging ideal of conformity.

“The ‘what would you do for attention’ line is a commentary on the cyclical, self-sacrifice and toxic modernity we all are seemingly forced into via social media,” explains WRENN. “It’s a partial takedown of the bullshit ‘influencers’ do, but is aware of how we all are secretly taking notes on their soul-sucking tactics for our own ‘internet personas.'”

And this raw truth builds the sonic construction. Distorted power chords and questioning lyrics make-up the track’s culture and eases into a more digestible alt-rock, while the verses isolate the heavy overlay. WRENN’s vocals are harmonic and thick, scuffed by her own principles. “How scared are you of being alone?” is at the belly of the track, and WRENN’s vocals soar across forthcoming and punchy percussion. There’s no denying that there is an aggressive and hostile nature that lives in the track but it isn’t as direct, what seems to be an intentional build of WRENN’s own “internet persona.”

It’s a solid return and peaks into a heavier direction for the artist, utilizing grunge roots for a modern take on the independent genre.


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