Videos

The Twilight Sad ‘I/m Not Here [missing face]’

Scottish post-punk band, The Twilight Sad, follow-up their newest single with a stirring visual offering that dives deep into personal battles.

Scottish ensemble — specifically from the realms of Banton, Kilsyth, and Glasgow — The Twilight Sad return with a visual counterpart for their somber, post-punk ballad, “I/m Not Here [missing face].” Since the track’s original unveiling back in July, which prompted a fruitful new start from touring with The Cure aside from their thoughts of calling it quits, frontman James Graham has expressed in a press statement about the track’s heaviness, stating it’s “about my ongoing battle with not liking myself, trying to be a good person but constantly feeling like I’m failing myself and everyone I care about.” Holding this notion to heart, paired with the disturbing stills of nostalgia, the video extracts Graham’s self-inflicting thoughts through the lens of repetition.

Directed by Brendan Jay Smith and edited by Michael Sherrington, the video’s VHS demeanor ages the video’s intent and aids as a personal viewfinder. Graham’s opening lines, “You’re too close for comfort / You’re too close to comfort me,” sets the tone of a disconnect and an ongoing ache, filled with teetering talks of destruction. Andy MacFarlane’s whispering guitar lines engulf the atmosphere, aided by suspenseful keys and a grounding bass. More melodic that typical post-punk offerings, the track itself bears heavier in meaning and is softened with shoegaze musings and noise rock traits.

 

Yet, the darker tone of the track allows for a vague and intricate portrayal that Smith and Sherrington surely used to their advantage. Diving into personal demons, shown as home movies one would witness during a homicide case for motives, “I/m Not Here [missing face]” is quite heavy. Piecing it together and reflecting on past mistakes, hostility, and accumulated baggage that is muddled from verse to verse, the video’s off-the-wall transitions direct a viewer to reoccurring nightmares, truly pulling a “raw” representation with oneself. Despite what may seem as a handful of negativity is actually an odd sort of optimism. The act of facing these thoughts head on, as well as showcasing them, could quite possibly be the more admirable notion of a human and of the band. If this is a taste of what is to come for future releases, the latest album from The Twilight Sad will be a welcoming return and honest change in direction.

Cover photo: Courtesy of Facebook via Meltdown


Catch The Twilight Sad on Tour

Oct. 09 Troubador, Los Angeles,CA

Oct. 10 Casbah, San Diego, CA

Oct. 12 Marty’s on Newport, Tustin, CA

Oct. 14 Independent, San Francisco, CA

More tour dates

 

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